Journal

2018-free-monthly-planning-calendar-download

This humble tool is one of the most powerful tools I use in my business, and that I use with clients. Because unless you can see your time laid out in front of you, you can’t make realistic plans, set achievable goals or get everyone aligned about what needs to be done, and by when.

I use this tool with my executive coaching clients to help them plan out an ideal week, and understand what’s achievable with their time. I use it with my content marketing clients to map out content plans, deadlines and publishing dates. I use it with my business clients to help them and their team see what needs to be done, and when by so they all get on the same page, literally. Read more…

Georgina ‘George’ McEnroe is the phenomenal woman behind Shebah, the Australian, all-female rideshare service. Think of it as lady Uber – owned by a woman, recruiting only women drivers and only taking women passengers and children. As a single mum of four kids, George created the service she needed, and in doing so created an economic platform, transport infrastructure and social support network needed by others too. Launched on International Women’s Day 2017, Shebah honours the particular needs of women and children to move through the world safely.  Read more…

Even when you’re working in a field that’s aligned with your purpose, career trajectories don’t always go to plan. Pivots are going to be necessary. Loretta Bolotin studied international development earning her jobs in the humanitarian sector across the world.  At the age of 24 she also became mama to Koan, and a juggled a full-time job working in gender justice in The Hague. As you’ll read, Loretta believed that this would give her right balance of career, purpose and parenting.

While husband Daniel became the primary carer for their son, ironically the human rights organisation Loretta was working for offered very limited flexibility for working parents (and not even a breastfeeding facility!), and delivered a punishing workload to boot. The reality of ‘balance’ didn’t measure up, and Loretta sharpened her sense of what really mattered in her life. And change needed to happen. Read more…

David Bowie Never Play To the Gallery

There’s no doubt that David Bowie was one of the world’s most exciting and creative artists of our time. He defied what was, and redefined what was possible. A perennial leap taker, entertainer and creative wizard. These are my most favourite of his words: Read more…

On Grief

Grief, after all, is the price we pay for love… Grief is a normal and healthy experience after loss. But so is resilience. Over the years an interesting change in grief therapy has been the emphasis on resilience; the awareness that people normally find healthy ways to adapt and live with loss. That’s not to say it’s a quick and easy task. It’s not that grieving suddenly ends and the person forgets and moves on. No, what happens is that a weight that initially feels unbearable becomes, in time, manageable. The grief becomes compact enough, with the hard edges removed, to be gently placed in one’s heart. – Momento Mori by David Malham, Grief Therapist, diagnosed with ALS/Motor Neurone Disease, for the New York Times

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Recently I was working with a coaching client, and I asked him to describe the kind of work he’d like to be doing in twelve months time. Very quickly he fell into the trap of thinking about the kind of ‘job’ he ‘could move into’, rather than the kinds of activities that felt energising and meaningful. He got stuck and said, ‘I can’t really describe it. What I’m thinking doesn’t exist.’ When I consciously pulled him back from naming a job title, to exploring ways of working, he quickly listed all the types of activities and qualities of those activities that he was drawn to. This did three things: 1. He gave himself permission to think outside of a known, defined job title; 2. He consciously thought about what he would like to do, rather than what he had always done; 3. It opened up a discussion about what he felt he deserved and what he could create. We disrupted his existing thoughts by imagining what could be. It was an invitation to innovate his working life. Read more…

In The Company Taking The Leap Live Panel Event Small Business Festival Victoria Women in Business

Proudly sponsored by: Victoria’s Small Business Festival

This special edition of In The Company was recorded live at Donkey Wheel House in Melbourne on Tuesday 15 August 2017, in front of a live audience of 50 women as part of the women in business week of the Victorian Small Business Festival.

Based on my book ‘The Leap Stories’, this event featured a panel of women who had taken the leap in their careers to start their own businesses who were keen to share their experiences and insights. Read more…

Prue Gilbert Grace Papers Podcast

In this episode of In The Company we speak with Prue Gilbert, lawyer, diversity strategist and founder of Grace Papers – a human rights award-winning digital platform designed to empower working parents to navigate career and family.

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Bronnie Ware interview on In The Company Podcast with Kylie Lewis

Bronnie Ware is a former banker, palliative carer, singer and songwriter, international speaker and author of several books, including the best selling, The Top Five Regrets of the Dying, and her latest book, Bloom: A Tale of Courage, Surrender and breaking through upper limits.

Through Bronnie’s work as a palliative carer, she uncovered the number one regret of the dying was that people wished they’d had the courage to live a life true to themselves, not the life others expected of them. People also wished they hadn’t worked so hard, and that they’d had the courage to express their feelings. Read more…

So often we are consumed with setting the goals, drawing a straight line to their completion and moving onto the next thing. It’s deliciously tempting to think about living our entire lives that way. But magic doesn’t happen at the coal face of constant engagement with what we already know. To think about creating a different kind of life, an alternative way of being in the world, we need to change our horizons and our roadmaps, sometimes, literally.

When mortgage broker Lauren Williams and freelance designer Alexander Knorr packed up for a holiday road trip around Tasmania, starting a business was not on their itinerary. But a chance forage in a town op shop to look for a hat for their journey sparked an idea. The arguments about whose turn it was to wear the vintage fedora they purchased, gradually turned into a more productive discussion about how they could bring hats like their special find to more people like them. And so Will and Bear, unisex hats for the road, came to be – but only after using their would-be house deposit to fund their first order. Read more…